Tag Archives: Shirley Chisholm

Women on Money…No, Really, Women ON Money

I have to admit that it was something I had not noticed until it was pointed out; there are no women on US paper money.  There’s Susan B. Anthony and Sacagawea on $1 coins, but when was the last time you even saw one of those?

So it’s appropriate that during this Women’s History Month, Barbara Ortiz Howard has started a campaign to get at least one women on a 20 dollar bill by the year 2020.  That year will mark the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment, which gave women the right to vote. The campaign, called Women on 20s, has whittled down the number of prime “candidates” to 15, and asks that people vote for their favorite three.

The unofficial start of this campaign can be traced back to July 2014, when a young girl wrote a note to President Obama, asking why there are no women on our paper money.  Obama publicly proclaimed that he thought it was a good idea.

The 20 was picked, by the way, in part, because it seems that Andrew Jackson, who is one of the men who currently resides on a 20, should be easy to dump since, among other things, he is the one who helped get the Indian Removal Act passed, which he then signed.  It forced the relocation of thousands and thousands of Native Americans, many of whom died during this horrific Trail of Tears.

There was a time in our history when, briefly, two women did appear on paper money. According to the website Wise Geek, “…, only two women have appeared on US paper money. Martha Washington, the wife of the first US president, George Washington, appeared on the series 1886 and 1891 $1 US Dollar (USD) silver certificates. She also was on the series 1896 $1 USD silver certificate, along with her husband. Pocahontas was featured on the series 1869-1878 $10 USD notes, with the image coming from an engraving of a painting by T.A. Liebler.”

It’s not clear why women disappeared from paper money after that time.  Perhaps a good historian will be able to fill us in on that.

In any event, it does feel like a notion whose time has come.

Everyone here at the office has already gone online and voted.  I admit to being a bit biased, since we have done work over the years for the Shirley Chisholm Project.  Ms. Chisholm, who was from our own hometown, Brooklyn, was the first black woman elected to Congress and the first black person to officially run for President of the United States.  She definitely got my vote.

Of course, for every campaign there are naysayers, and this one is no different.  That right wing pundit Stephen Colbert is against putting women on our paper money and like Stephen Colbert and I think I will let him have the last word.

Latest Client News – Week of June 16, 2014

Last Friday, June 13th, in a follow up to the ongoing NYU expansion struggle in Greenwich Village, a coalition of over 20 community members and groups filed a legal brief in the state appellate court in Manhattan.

A trial court in January held that the City violated state law by allowing NYU to take over three public parks for construction-related purposes during the twenty-year expansion project. The City and NYU have appealed this part of the lower court’s ruling.

The community coalition asks the appeals court to uphold the trial court, and to require the City and NYU to halt the project, reexamine the building plans and City approvals that were based on the illegal alienation of public parkland, and conduct a proper environmental review that takes the protected status of these parks into account. The parks defenders have also asked the appellate court to hold that the Mercer-Houston Dog Run, like the other three parcels, is public parkland.

The lawsuit, originally filed in September 2012, challenges decisions by the City and the State to approve the massive Sexton Plan, a $6 billion, almost two million square foot construction plan in the heart of historic Greenwich Village, for the convenience of NYU.

Meanwhile, Prof. Micha Tomkiewicz, author of the Climate Change Fork blog is currently attending the Sixth International Conference on Climate Change in Reykjavik, Iceland. Stay tuned for his update when he returns.

Barbara Winslow had a book party on May 19th at the Mott House in Washington D.C., where both Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton and House Minority Leader Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi gave remarks.

Latest Client News – Week of April 14, 2014

New! Barbara Winslow’s new biography of Shirley Chisholm was just mentioned and quoted in Newsweek’s obituary of the Harlem politician Basil Paterson.

The New York Times just published an article about NYU’s Chairman of the Board, Marty Lipton, calling him The Power Broker of N.Y.U.. In addition to discussing NYU’s corporate structure, and the scandalous bonus packages for an elite few administrators, the article quotes NYUFASP’s Mark Crispin Miller, who confirms that for all its talk of faculty input, NYU officials did not consult either them or the community while planning the 2031 Expansion Plan.

Barbara Winslow just got back from Atlanta, GA, where she gave a talk at Spelman College about Archiving. She also attended the Organization of American Historians’ annual meeting, where she took part in a panel about social and political biography. Her talk focused on “Writing About a First: Shirley Chisholm, Feminism, the Black Freedom Struggle and the Democratic Party.”

In CUNY Radio’s Podcast, “Book Beat” interview with Barbara, she gives some highlights of her research about Shirley Chisholm. Barbara will be doing readings/signings of her book, Shirley Chisholm: Catalyst for Change, at Sister’s Uptown Bookstore and Cultural Center on April 23rd, and at Bluestockings on May 19th. See our Upcoming Events page for more details. You can also download the book digitally on Amazon.com.

Prof. Micha Tomkiewicz was featured in an article in the Poughkeepsie Journal. The article, a response to his National Climate Seminar talk, was written by students from Bard College’s Center for Environmental Policy (CEP).

Latest Client News – Week of February 24, 2014

Prof. Micha Tomkiewicz will be giving a seminar about adaptation to climate change this Wednesday, March 5th! In other news, we’re coming to the end of Black History Month, and transitioning into Women’s History Month. While we don’t agree with relegating the celebration of these two important populations to mere months, they do give us more chances to talk about Barbara Winslow’s wonderful new biography of Shirley Chisholm. She’s been in the news quite a lot recently, and we’re quite proud.

Prof. Tomkiewicz’s talk is part of the National Climate Seminar, which is hosted biweekly by Bard College’s Center for Environmental Policy (CEP). The talk will be in a dial-in format, and will run from noon until 1pm. To listen, Call in to: 1-712-432-3100. Code: 253385. His talk, “Desalination as Adaptation,” will also be available on the CEP archives website after Thursday. You can read Prof. Tomkiewicz’s weekly blog at Climate Change Fork.

Meanwhile, Barbara was featured on Errol Louis’ Inside City Hall show on NY1 along with Shola Lynch, director of the documentary Shirley Chisholm: Unbought and Unbossed. The three of them discussed Ms. Chisholm’s legacy, her importance in today’s world, and how her current acclaim differs from how she was received by her contemporaries.

Barbara also appeared on ABC-TV’s Here and Now show to talk with host Sandra Bookman about the book, why parts of it prompt such anger and frustration among many readers, and what it means to bring Ms. Chisholm’s story out of the dry world of trivia facts, into the light of present-day notice.

Latest Client News – Week of February 10, 2014

Black History Month continues, and we are happy to note that Barbara Winslow’s new biography of Shirley Chisholm is quickly gaining recognition.

The book, Shirley Chisholm: Catalyst for Change, is the first in over 40 years, and the only one to cover the later part of Ms. Chisholm’s life. Ms. Chisholm, who was the nation’s first African American woman elected to Congress and the first to run for President, fought for equal pay, access to education, universal child care and many other issues that still resonate today. In fact, the US Post Office just came out with a stamp in her honor!

And it appears that news about the new book is spreading fast, and journalists, scholars and the general public are taking notice.

Tonight, Friday, February 14th, Barbara will join Shola Lynch, director of the documentary Shirley Chisholm: Unbought and Unbossed on Errol LouisInside City Hall show on NY1. They will discuss Ms. Chisholm’s legacy, her importance in today’s world, and how her current acclaim differs from how she was received by her contemporaries. Tune in tonight, Friday at 7pm or 10pm, or watch for the online link after the show airs.

Barbara will also appear this Sunday, February 16th @ noon on ABC-TV’s Here and Now show to talk with host Sandra Bookman about the book, why parts of it prompt such anger and frustration among many readers, and what it means to bring Ms. Chisholm’s story out of the dry world of trivia facts, into the light of present-day notice.

The book has been getting noticed in print and online too.  The New York Times’  Sam Roberts highlighted the biography in his latest book selection column on February 6th. The Park Slope Patch interviewed Barbara about the Chisholm Project at Brooklyn College, and her inspiration to write the book.  The Brooklyn Paper also interviewed Barbara about her quest to keep Ms. Chisholm’s name and significance fresh in current history, and the role she sees the detailed and enlightening book playing in remedying the gap in our collective memory.  The site Truthout also offered their own, very positive review of the book.

We hope you’ll check out these stories, and tune in for Barbara’s television appearances! The book is available on all the main online stores, like Amazon, as well as in kindle ebook format.

Latest Client News – Week of February 3, 2014

It’s Black History Month, and we are happy to note that Barbara Winslow’s new biography of Shirley Chisholm is gaining recognition.

The book, Shirley Chisholm: Catalyst for Change, is the first in over 40 years, and the only one to cover the later part of Ms. Chisholm’s life. Ms. Chisholm, who was the nation’s first African American woman elected to Congress and the first to run for President, fought for equal pay, access to education, universal child care and many other issues that still resonate today.

We are thrilled to announce that Sam Roberts just wrote about the book in his column in the New York Times. Meanwhile, the Park Slope Patch published a short interview with Barbara Winslow, and the Brooklyn Paper recently wrote an article about the biography, emphasizing the importance of keeping Ms. Chisholm’s memory fresh in today’s world. Meanwhile, in recognition of her immense contributions, the U.S. Postal Service has just come out with a stamp commemorating Ms. Chisholm.

The author, Barbara Winslow, is a professor of Women’s Studies at Brooklyn College, and is responsible for starting and running the Shirley Chisholm Project/Brooklyn Women’s Activism at Brooklyn College. The Project has catalogued many of Ms. Chisholm’s original materials, and there are amazing oral histories/accounts from people who actually knew/worked with Ms. Chisholm, or were influenced by her legacy, like Anita Hill, Gloria Steinem, Donna Brazile, Joyce Bolden, Patricia Schroeder, and former NYC Mayor David Dinkins. The book includes insights from all of these contributors, as well as information from Ms. Chisholm’s own FBI file. You can see the Project’s website here.

On a sadder note, we would like to express our deep regret for the loss of one of our era’s most talented actors, Mr. Philip Seymour Hoffman. We join with so many around the country to express our sadness and sympathy for his family and friends. We knew him as a Village denizen and a supporter of all things Greenwich Village. He will be missed.

Latest Client News – Week of January 13, 2014

In our latest news, NYUFASP is celebrating a huge victory in its suit against the City, and author Barbara Winslow has finally released her long-awaited book about Shirley Chisholm.

After a long, tense wait, Justice Donna Mills released a verdict on January 7th, ruling that the city acted illegally when it gave three out of four parcels of parkland to NYU for its 2031 expansion plan in July of 2012. A coalition of Village residents, NYU faculty members (NYUFASP) and elected officials launched an Article 78 lawsuit against the city after the plan’s approval, arguing, among other things, that the City had violated the law when it wrongfully granted NYU the use of the land involved. The $6 billion expansion plan is scheduled to last for 20 years, calls for 1.9 million square feet of new buildings in the heart of the Village, is totally unnecessary, and will crush the Village.  The judge ruled that three out of the four parcels of green space were “impliedly” parks, and that the city had acted against the public trust doctrine by seizing these public lands and awarding them to a private entity without going through the proper process of parkland alienation. This is a huge victory, and a turning point in the battle to stop the plan.

On Friday, January 10th, Barbara Winslow had a book launch party for her new book, Shirley Chisholm: Catalyst for Change. The book is a new biography of one of the most important figures in American history – and, in particular, the history of women and women of color in this country – Shirley Chisholm.  She was the first African-American woman elected to Congress and the first to run for President.  Way ahead of her time, Ms. Chisholm’s concerns still resonate today – equal pay, access to education, universal child care – and on and on.

There has been no modern or definitive biography of Ms. Chisholm written to date; the last one was 40 years ago.  The new book is much more in depth, and contains many interesting new insights and interviews – in fact, it is the only book published that covers the later part of Ms. Chisholm’s life.

The author, Barbara Winslow, is a professor of Women’s Studies at Brooklyn College, and is responsible for starting and running the Shirley Chisholm Project/Brooklyn Women’s Activism at Brooklyn College.  The Project has catalogued many of Ms. Chisholm’s original materials, and there are amazing oral histories/accounts from people who actually knew/worked with Ms. Chisholm, or were influenced by her legacy, like Anita Hill, Gloria Steinem, Donna Brazile, Joyce Bolden, Patricia Schroeder, and former NYC Mayor David Dinkins.

Week of November 18, 2013

Our clients are always up to something, and we want to make sure they get the credit they deserve for their latest ventures. In recent news, Theater Three Collaborative has just launched an Indiegogo campaign to help fund a full production of its new eco-drama about climate change. Meanwhile, NYUFASP has published a series of emails taking stock of the administration’s overinflated salaries as compared to the financial struggle enforced upon the faculty and students. Theater Three Collaborative (TTC) has started an Indiegogo campaign to help with funding a full production of its new eco-drama, Extreme Whether. The play has received numerous accolades from renowned scientists, writers and environmental activists including world-famous climate scientist James Hansen, and prominent arctic ice scientist Jennifer Francis. TTC has presented several readings of the play so far, one of which featured Zach Grenier of TV’s The Good Wife. TTC plans for the play to run from March 20 – April 13, 2014 at Theater for the New City, with each show followed by a “Festival of Conscience” discussion with a major scientist or environmentalist. The Extreme Whether Indiegogo campaign includes premiums for each level of giving, ranging from tickets to the play to Sniffley the frog umbrellas (Sniffley is a character in the play), to a tour of Parsons-Meares Costumes, one of New York’s major costume shops.  Parson-Meares has designed costumes for all TTC productions since 1995, and builds costumes for Spider Man, Cinderella and other major Broadway shows. There is also an option for a home-cooked meal by the playwright. NYU Faculty Against the Sexton Plan (NYUFASP), which has been fighting against the NYU administration’s excesses and ill conceived projects has put out a list of the salaries given to the “essential” administrative staff. It is increasingly clear that the gap between their compensation and that of the professors is ever widening, even as the students bear the brunt of this increase. This only adds credence to the fact that the NYU 2031 expansion plan is part of a wider pattern of spending which seems determined to add to the debt owed by its students (who already carry one of the highest debt loads in the nation), to the detriment of its academic offerings. This is a disturbing trend for a so-called “institute of higher learning.” Meanwhile, LCG is happy to announce that we will be working with Professor Barbara Winslow, who runs the Shirley Chisholm Project at Brooklyn College. She has written a definitive biography of Shirley Chisholm – which will be out this month – and we are thrilled to be helping her publicize it.

Week of November 4, 2013

Our top stories this week involve NHS and its efforts to honor the past while paving the future for Superstorm Sandy survivors, and Professor Barbara Winslow’s upcoming book.

The anniversary of Superstorm Sandy was last week, and Neighborhood Housing Services of New York City (NHSNYC) was busy with supporting the communities that are still experiencing the aftereffects. NHS of East Flatbush joined the community at a candlelight vigil in Canarsie, Brooklyn to commemorate the losses and push for more recovery funding. The nonprofit also held a housing fair, in partnership with Councilman Jumaane Williams, which included a workshop on disaster preparedness, foreclosure intervention counseling aimed at educating and aiding homeowners and buyers in the wake of the destruction. The housing fair, which was free and open to the public also had experts on hand to answer questions about homeowner insurance, mortgages, water bill payments and other related issues to buying or maintaining a home.

In other news, LCG is happy to announce that we will be working with Professor Barbara Winslow, who runs the Shirley Chisholm Project at Brooklyn College. She has written a biography of Shirley Chisholm – which will be out this month – and we are thrilled to be helping her publicize it.