Category Archives: NYC

Client News: ERFA’s New Zoning Plan to Stop Supertowers

East River Fifties Alliance Files New Zoning Plan, Promotes Affordable Housing; Manhattan Borough President Brewer, City Council Members Kallos and Garodnick, and State Senator Krueger Co-Sign

After months of intense preparation, our clients, the East River Fifties Alliance (ERFA), just filed a new zoning plan for Manhattan’s Far East 50s (the area between 52nd Street and 59th Street, east of 1st Avenue) with the Department of City Planning. The new zoning plan would restrict supertowers and out-of-scale development in that neighborhood, while providing for affordable housing. Not only that, but they had an elite list of co-filers: Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, City Council Members Ben Kallos and Dan Garodnick, and State Senator Liz Krueger.

This proposal, created via a partnership between the community (through ERFA) and city planners, is one of the most sweeping community residential re-zoning plans in City history, and the first plan of its kind to include affordable housing as a component.

Currently, the Far East Fifties is vulnerable to gigantic megatower development because its zoning is left over from the 1960s and sets no specific height limits on apartment buildings. It’s the last residential-only segment of the city that remains without such protections. (The same zoning is generally limited to busy commercial or mixed use avenues in Manhattan.)  In fact, one developer has already proposed a wildly oversized 1,000 foot megatower on East 58th Street between First Avenue and Sutton Place that would dwarf the entire neighborhood. ERFA is working to prevent not only that project but all others like it.

Affordable Housing

As Mayor de Blasio has voiced repeatedly, NYC needs affordable housing badly. ERFA not only agrees, but the neighborhood is welcoming such opportunities with open arms. This new zone would urge developers to devote at least 25% of new units to affordable housing in the neighborhood.

As it stands, the East River Fifties’ R10 zone and equivalent zones throughout the city only create about 4-5% affordable units with each new development. If fully implemented, the ERFA plan would nearly quadruple the amount of affordable housing in new developments in our neighborhood. The details of how that goal could be best met – whether by making the affordable housing component mandatory, voluntary, or by some other formulation – will be determined in ERFA’s negotiations with City Planning. it will enter a review process that moves through the various levels of New York City’s government for approval. You can learn more about ERFA and its new zoning plan at www.erfa.nyc

The media is already excited and we’ve received a slew of stories. Here are a few: City Land (New York Law School), Crain’s New York Business, Curbed, DNA Info, Manhattan Express, New York Daily News, Our Town Press, Realty Today, and The Real Deal.

Truthiness: How Hard Can the Windbags Blow?

Truth, Fact, Interpretation, Misdirection – In An Age of Liars, We Need A Decoder Ring

Think about this: we know the difference between truth and lies. Presumably, we form our opinions from the information given to us. Certainly, this ought to be the case for things like policy decisions. Shouldn’t our elected officials be able to incorporate relevant facts and factors into their plans of what to do next? Stephen Colbert’s “Truthiness” is alarmingly relevant right now.

When I was in college, I took a tremendous class from well-known writer Francine Prose, called “Language, Literature, and Lies.” Though I didn’t know it at the time, it was a great primer for my work in PR. One of the most lasting exercises was to read the same big news story in three major outlets (The New York Times, The New York Post, and The Guardian). We pored over the articles, picking out how the authors referred to their subjects (e.g. President Obama, Barack Obama, Obama, Mr. Obama, the president, etc.), which snippets of quotes they chose to cite, how they framed an issue, and who they gave the last word. Subtle choices conveyed biases. As humans, it is nearly impossible for us to describe happenings completely objectively – the nature of language is that it necessarily filters everything through our own lens; our own version of truth.

That said, while most media outlets use specific language to shape their version of events, they still stick to the same basic facts in news. That’s something we expect; why read or watch news if none of it is true? So it is jarring to note that when it comes to picking candidates for the presidency, many voters are keen to disregard flat out lies so long as they serve a particular agenda. The author of Wag the Dog recently wrote a biting op-ed about this in Al Jazeera, and multiple papers have referenced Politifact’s “Truth-O-Meter” with regards to candidate claims (it ranges from true to pants on fire).

I’m a big proponent of free speech, but I do believe that there is a difference between fact and opinion. Facts are, by nature, true. They are true whether you believe them or not. The converse is not the case. Unfortunately for some of us dreamers, simply believing something very fervently does not magically make it true. There is a danger to pandering to that falsehood. We can handle the truth, and we must if we expect to do anything helpful or relevant in life.

Stephen Colbert: Truthiness

Climate Change Scientists Take Nantucket Sleighride

Take Your Own Nantucket Sleighride: How Old Whaling Ships Are Helping in the Fight to Stop Climate Change

In the wake of the recent UN climate change conference in Paris, there’s lots of discussion about the subject. Some argue that the accord that was reached is historic and a huge step in the right direction, while others argue that the accord doesn’t go nearly far enough.

Meanwhile, there are scientists and others who get up every day and fight the battle against climate change as best they can, accord or not.

And so, one on-the-ground tidbit that got very little attention in all the hubbub about the Paris conference was this, as reported by the Associated Press: “Maritime historians, climate scientists and ordinary citizens are coming together on a project to study the logbooks of 19th-century whaling ships to better understand modern-day climate change and Arctic weather patterns.”

This fascinating project called Old Weather: Whaling will comb through approximately 2600 whaling logbooks, dating from 1756 – 1965, because they can yield valuable information about longitude and latitude measurements, weather conditions, the presence of icebergs and the edge of the ice shelf. This can help climate scientists compare weather and ice conditions, then and now, and can also help create advanced computer models that, based on the information from the logs, might be able to predict future conditions.

According to the AP story, Kevin Wood, a climate scientist with NOAA’s Joint Institute for the Study of the Ocean and Atmosphere at the University of Washington and a lead researcher on the project calls this a “virtual time-traveling weather satellite.”

“We can build an enormously detailed reconstruction of the conditions at the time … and we can we can understand how the climate has been changing over a longer period of time,” Wood said.

The Old Weather: Whaling project is led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The New Bedford Whaling Museum (Massachusetts) is, “transcribing and digitizing its own logbooks, as well as original data sources from the Nantucket Historical Association, Martha’s Vineyard Museum, Mystic Seaport in Connecticut, and the New Bedford Free Public Library.”

The digitized logbooks are being placed online and the public is asked to help sift through the thousands and thousands of pages of material. There are already 20 whalers’ logbooks online.

So here’s something you can “do” about climate change. You can actually participate in a project that will advance climate research. Check out Old Weather: Whaling to learn more. Meanwhile, have yourself a good Nantucket sleighride! (While you’re at it, go ahead and listen to Mountain’s “Nantucket Sleighride.”)

4/27 – Don’t Miss This Great Event – Three Women Transforming Healthcare: From the Battlefield to Veterans and Beyond; Using More Than Western Medicine to Achieve Optimal Wellness

A conversation with Amy Coleman, MD, Robin Carnes, and Peggy Huddleston, moderated by Tournesol’s Carey Davidson.

Creating institutional change isn’t easy. When will medicine be integrated with a vision for our highest selves?

Our medical care is defined by how it is administered in hospitals, the armed forces and to veterans. Sit with us and learn from these three women visionaries who are actively bringing yoga, mind-body techniques and inspiration-driven medicine to these three profoundly important institutions.

Event details:

Date:   Monday, April 27, 2015

Place:  Impact Hub NYC, 394 Broadway (between White and Walker Sts.) NY, NY 10013
Phone: 646-395-1114
Time: Doors open at 7pm; Discussion begins at 7:30pm.
Tickets:  Early Bird tickets (before or by April 20) are $30; after April 20th, tickets are $40. Buy tickets here.

A portion of this event’s proceeds will go to Warriors At Ease.

Produced by Tournesol and Body Local. Sponsored by GLOW Beauty, Health and Wellness Magazine


About the Speakers:

Amy Coleman, MD is President of Wellsmart, which empowers patients with inspiration-driven action plans and resiliency training. Dr. Coleman served as a Flight Surgeon for the U.S. Air Force where she was selected as primary physician for General Officer Staff, Special Forces Teams, NASA Shuttle support missions, and F-16 Fighter Squadrons. She was also appointed as the youngest and first female Commander of the U.S. Air Force Special Operations Clinic. There, she guided global medical missions and built creative clinic systems including those employing complementary care methods still employed today throughout the U.S. Air Force.

Robin Carnes is the Executive Director and Co-Founder of Warriors At Ease (WAE), which trains yoga and meditation teachers (and other mind/body professionals) to teach safely and effectively in military settings. Since 2009, WAE has trained over 500 yoga professionals in their trauma-sensitive, culturally-informed and evidence-based approach.

Peggy Huddleston is the author of Prepare for Surgery, Heal Faster. She developed five steps to prepare for surgery using mind-body techniques. Research studies show her method significantly reduces anxiety, use of pain medication and speeds healing. Patients having colorectal surgery and knee-joint replacement healed faster, leaving the hospital 1.3-1.6 days sooner than the control group. Prepare for Surgery, Heal Faster Workshops are offered for free to patients at hospital including NYU Langone Medical Center and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, a Harvard Medical School teaching hospital.

Carey Davidson is the Founder & CEO of Tournesol Wellness. Tournesol is an integrative medical center in midtown Manhattan providing personalized holistic and integrative care through its 40 vetted specialists and more than 30 modalities. Tournesol’s Live Well and Stay Well programs identify and treat all variables that contribute to a resilient body and mind. Carey also serves as the Co-President of the Manhattan Chapter of the Holistic Chamber of Commerce building the visibility and viability of holistic businesses.